NAVAL GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL WITH NASSAU 22 MARCH 1808 CLASP TO JAMES TOOTH

Naval General Service Medal with Nassau 22 March 1808 clasp to James Tooth. Provenance: ex-J. Lawson Whalley Collection 1877, ex-Jubilee Collection, Glendinings 1992. 1 of just 31 medals issued with this clasp.
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NOW£5,995.00
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Description

James Tooth was serving as Landsman aboard H.M.S. Nassau when, in company of H.M.S. Stately, she destroyed the Danish 74-gun man-o' war Prince Christian Frederick at Grenaa off the east coast of Jutland on 22 Mar 1808. Nassau and Stately were cruising towards the Green Bell when they sighted the Danish ship, and gave chase. The Nassau caught up with the Danes at 7.40pm and commenced firing. A running battle with both Nassau and Stately began, with the Danish ship finally striking her colours at 9.30pm. Just 500 yards from shore, the Danish ship grounded and prisoners were taken aboard both British vessels. Unable to refloat the captured ship, instead the Prince Christian Frederick was set alight and blew up just as a number of Danish militia were approaching the area with artillery. For this action, two clasps were issued; one Nassau 22 March 1808 of which 30 were claimed, the other Stately 22 March 1808 of which 31 were claimed. A unique Royal Navy name on the roll (a Royal Marine with the same name served at the Battle of Trafalgar aboard H.M.S. Africa), James Tooth was born in 1785 in Mitcham, Surrey. James Tooth entered the Royal Navy and first served as a Volunteer on H.M.S. Princess of Orange on 23 Jun 1803 and was present at the blockade of Texel from 1803 until the ship was paid off in Feb 1806 and transferred to the crew of the 64-gun H.M.S. Nassau on 7 Feb 1806. After the victorious engagement with the Prince Christian Frederick, Tooth was discharged with Typhus to Yarmouth Hospital on 6 May 1808, returning to Nassau on 16 Jun 1808 until the ship was paid off at the start of Nov 1809. Joining 38-gun frigate H.M.S. Rota on 10 Nov 1809, Tooth participated in the action against American privateer schooner General Armstrong, captained by Samuel Chester Reid in Fayal Harbour of the Azores in 1814. The American consul had come aboard the General Armstrong on the afternoon of 26 Sep 1814 and assured Captain Reid that no British vessels had been seen in the area. As he did so, the 18-gun H.M.S. Carnation rounded the northern point of the anchorage and moored within a pistol shot of the general Armstrong. Captain Reid considered cutting his cable and making a run for it, but was assured by the American consul that Portuguese neutrality would guarantee the safety of his ship. The fifth-rate Tooth was finally discharged from service as per Order of the Rear Admiral on 11 May 1815.