WWII D.S.M. & YANGTZE GROUP OF 6 MEDALS TO TEMP. A/L.S. E.H. ARNUP, H.M.S. MILNE & H.M.S. LONDON

** NEW ** Distinguished Service Medal George VI to Temp. A/L.S. E.H. Arnup, C/JX. 171828; 1939-45 Star; Atlantic Star; WWII War Medal; Naval General Service Medal with Yangtze 1949 clasp to C/MX 804634 E.H. Arnup, D.S.M. L.E.M. R.N.; U.N.Korea Medal.
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Description

D.S.M. Gazetted 6 Mar 1945:

"For skill, resource and determination in anti U-boat operations whilst serving in HMS Milne".

Edward Henry Arnup was born in St. Faith's, Norfolk in 1924 and was Temporary Acting Leading Seaman aboard H.M.S. Milne on 31 May 1944 when she was part of a destroyer force screening for aircraft carriers HMS Victorious, Furious and heavy cruisers HMS Berwick & Devonshire in the Artic waters off the Norweigan coast. By chance, Lieutenant John Humphrey Stucley sighted the periscope of a U-Boat penetrating the screen. He immediately ordered A.B. Edward Arnup to launch depth charges from the bridge in its direction, forcing the U-Boat to momentarily surface. Arnup was credited with the final blows that would sink U-289, with the loss of Commander Alexander Hellwig and all 50 hands:

"This rating was largely responsible for the effectiveness of the depth-charge attacks by his cool and coreect action on the bridge."

For this action, Lt. Stucley was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and A.B. Arnup the Distinguished Service Medal.

In April 1949, the forces of the Chinese Nationalist Government and of the Communist People’s Liberation Army faced each other across the Yangtze River. The Royal Navy's H.M.S. Amethyst was attacked when approaching Kiangyin up the Yangzte River. Her commander was mortally wounded and the ship grounded. H.M.S. Consort, Black Swan and London went to her assistance and Black Swan was heavily shelled as they attempted to help Amethyst and retreated with 3 killed and 14 wounded. H.M.S. London was badly damaged and would later be scrapped. Amythyst herself remained captive in the Yangtze for over three
months before breaking out and making her epic escape.